Internet of Things: “from buzzword to differentiator”

Business Model Innovation, Business models, Caesar, Digital maturity, Digital Strategy, digital transformation, Innovation, Inspiring, Internet of Everything, Internet of things, IoE, IoT, Uncategorized

This blog originally appeared on the Caesar Experts blog

Internet of Things as a buzzword – The Internet of Things (IoT) is a buzzword which cannot be removed from our trend scene recently. Everyone is talking about the Internet of Things or one of the many synonyms of it, but what is IoT exactly? In the upcoming blog series of three articles, I will elaborate on IoT as a trend, several concrete examples will briefly pass by, and we will see how your organization can start concretely. In this article, “Internet of Things 1/3 – from buzzword to differentiator” I will elaborate on what this technological development is and we will point to the IoT as a trend.

What is the Internet of Things? – The Internet of Things is a technological development in which machines, building, people & other objects can be connected to the internet or another network. By providing the above objects with sensors & actuators, you can quickly generate data through these objects. Through the internet or another network, the data will come towards you, which gives you a lot more data about the internal processes of an object or the external processes, the environment. This data can be of incredible importance to creating a strategy whether it is for realizing new revenue models, reducing costs or optimizing company processes.

Image 1: IoT Business DNA

 Getting back to the term Internet of Things. What does this technological trend include? There are many definitions & synonyms described on the Internet of Things, in this article I want to engage how we, at Caesar, use the Internet of Things, in two parts:

Insight – Under insight, we count the measuring through sensors, the collecting of data and the analyzing of collected data.

Influence – Under influence, we understand the communicating to users/decision-makers, a different way of interacting than we have seen up until now and the automating of processes.

From data to wisdom – Nowadays the Internet of Things wins its popularity because we live in a world which has engaged in a complete ‘run’ on data. That is only logical! With data, you can make choices for your company by using correct and complete information and offer the customer services that they want.

Image 2: Insight & Influence

 The intertwining of an old and a new world – Where you can optimise processes, production, assets and logistics with the Internet of Things, you can also influence the business of tomorrow. For example, you can use the Internet of Things to work with entirely new business models which strengthen customer relations, apply other revenue and payment models, change the ways of dealing with upselling & lock-in and have data function as an extra source of income.

 Summarized we can say that the Internet of Things makes it possible to collect more data, which gives you a better grip on your business of today and give you the insight and influence of tomorrow.

 

“Have you thought about which impact this trend has on your company and which chances this brings for you?”

 

Knowing more about the Internet of Things – Could your organization use some help to start with a case concretely? We like to help to work towards your goal using the examples above. For more information, you can get in contact with me here to talk about an IoT inspiration session or IoT brain game.

 Do you want to know more about how your organization can use the Internet of Things? Let me know and maybe I can help you.

Image credits

#4 books on technology & digital transformation you should read

Business Model Innovation, Business models, Capgemini, Capgemini Consulting, Didier Bonnet, Digital maturity, Digital Strategy, digital transformation, Expert Connect, Innovation, Internet of things, Leading Digital, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MIT, MIT sloan

These days there are an exploding amount of books on technology. Personally I think the books below are really insight full and I would recommand these books.

 

#1 – “The Second Machine Age” by Erik Brynjolfsson & Andrew McAfee

View, “Race with the machines: Erik Brynjolfsson at TED2013”, here

 

#2 – “Leading Digital” – “Turning technology into business transformation” from George Westerman of MIT, Didier Bonnet of Capgemini Consulting, and Andrew McAfee, also at MIT.

View Didier Bonnet’s keynote presentation on “Leading Digital” at Oracle Open World 2014 here.

 

#3 – “The Innovators” – “How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution”, by Walter Isaacson

The Washington Post Book review, The New York Times review, The Wallstreet Journal review

Check Walter Isaacson out during a Google Talk discussion

 

#4 – “Enchanted Objects” – by David Rose

His popular book, Enchanted Objects: Design, Human Desire, and the Internet of Things, focuses on the future of the internet of things and how these technologies will impact the ways we live and work. He’s also a lecturer at the MIT Media Lab and has worked with the Tangible Media and City Science groups. David holds patents for photo sharing, interactive TV, ambient information displays and medical devices. His work has been featured at the MoMA, covered in The New York Times, WIRED, The Economist, and parodied on The Colbert Report. Source: https://enchantedobjects.com/about/

Check out David Rose his Tedx keynote on Enchanted Objects

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Digital Transformation: “Making sense of the mess we made with it”

Artificial Intelligence, Business Model Innovation, Business models, Capgemini Consulting, Digital maturity, Digital Strategy, digital transformation, Innovation, Leaders, Leading Digital, Marketing, technology

 

This article originally appeared on SogetiLabs

 

Digital Transformation

It does not matter how big or small you are. Concepts of innovation are overwhelming your feeds on different social platforms. Over-hyped technology buzz-words and start-up (or whatever) approaches are knocking on our doors… but do they make sense?

 An important thing to remember is to start with your company goals and apply technology to achieve these goals. Not the other way around. A lot of companies are adopting different types of technologies, but have no clue about what they should do with it.

Let us start from the beginning. We are living in a Digital world. Technology is everywhere around us. With Digital going mainstream, we will talk about Digital Transformation.

In a nutshell: 

  “Digital Transformation is the collective noun of the movement, which intertwine the physical and digital world to better determine client, customer and target audience needs to deliver excellent products & services with an excellent digital experience by the use of new technology.”

If you ask me, Digital Transformation is the process that companies follow when applying new technology to reach company goals. It’s about having a strategic mindset of what you want to reach and then applying the fitting technology to get a step (or a few) closer.

Digital Transformation is a new way of developing / working / delivering for you and your company; but it improves those items on various aspects. Think about the possibilities for items like: Visibility, efficiency, effectiveness, value creation, speed, scalability, customer experience, product development, innovation and so on.

An important thing to remember is: Step out of all the rumors and think about your vision. What do you want to reach? Then apply the right technology, which supports that vision.

Another important thing to note is: Be where your target audience is. Let your company be inspired by the way your customers use Digital solutions and facilitate them in using it. Make their lives easier by adding value to the reason of your existence, your products and services.

Of course, Digital Transformation is going to change the way you develop / work and deliver. Of course, your business model will change. But it will change your business model in a way to get closer to the people you serve. Is it a bad thing? No way. It has always been like this and will always be. The only thing that changes is the trend or technology we are talking about. In a few years, you will only remember the following:

“Digital Transformation: The paradigm shift towards business as usual”

If you want to learn more about Digital Transformation and find out answers on questions like:

  • “What is Digital Transformation?”
  • “How can I use Digital Transformation in my advantage?”
  • “How to adapt/ implement a Digital Transformation Strategy”
  • “How can I offer solutions that serves the client/ customer need in 2020?”
  • “What is the relation between Digital Transformation & Digital Customer Experience?”

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SMAC Your Customer with Things & Services – A historic necessity unfolds

Business Model Innovation, Business models, Capgemini, Capgemini Consulting, Carlota Perez, Digital maturity, Digital Strategy, digital transformation, Expert Connect, Innovation, Inspiring, Internet of Everything, Internet of things, IoE, IoT, Leading Digital

This article originally appeared on Capgemini ‘s Expert Connect “Capping IT off” blog in the category: Digital Strategies.

This blog post is a joint effort of SogetiLabs members Jaap Bloem & Rick Bouter.

Services companies nowadays extend the customer journey with products while product brands add services to optimize customer intimacy. Either way, digital does the trick and often sensors and smartphone apps are involved to gather and deliver information and functionality. Nissan has a special smartwatch for car functions, Philips now sells the Hue personal wireless lighting system, insurers offer personalized pricing based on driving behaviour and energy companies let customers profit from smart metering. Microsoft and Nokia specialize in devices and services, from Lumia Windows phones and navigation to XBOX Music and SmartGlass. ParkMe is the largest real-time car parker in the United States delivering physical space though digital information. One of the nicest examples of how a cross-industry ecosystem of digital things and services could function is the Microsoft HealthVault vision. And Motorola makes the case for password pills, adding swallowables to wearables like Google Glass.

PICT: Personal, Intelligent & Calm Things
When Kevin Ashton, director of the MIT Auto-ID Institute, in 1999 operationalized his RFID solution at Procter & Gamble, calling it the Internet of Things, he could only have dreamed of what an adolescent Internet of Things and Services – to quote Bosch – might economically mean. From 2015 on, trillions of dollars are projected by experts from McKinsey and Harbor Research, among many others. This is Bill Buxton’s ‘long nose of innovation’ in action and that has nothing to do with lies. For technological innovation to really take off always lasts a few decades, as we know from the work of Carlota Perez.

Unspecific names are used to denote the impact of digital things and services, ranging from the Internet of Everything (Cisco) to the Industrial Internet (General Electric), the Internet of Sensors and Actuators (Vint Cerf, Google) or the Web of the World (Marc Davis, Microsoft). Germans speak of Industrie 4.0, the new wave after mechanization, electrification and information technology.

From a consumer perspective the best way to describe what’s going on around the individual would be PICT: Personal, Intelligent & Calm Things based on PICTechnology, or Personal ICT, including Near Field Computing (NFC) rings and bracelets. Three years ago, the Georgia Institute of Technology delivered an article called The Internet of Nano-Things and indeed developments coming from the Manchester UK Graphene Institute will greatly improve what will be possible with digital things and services.

A Matter of Time
Some twenty years ago, back in 1995, MIT Media Lab director Nicholas Negroponte published a book that by its title says it all: ‘Being Digital.’ One major conclusion was already drawn after the first pages:  ‘computing is not about computers anymore, it’s about living.’ Years before, in 1988, Xerox PARC’s chief technologist Mark Weiser had started to talk about Ubiquitous Computing, aka Pervasive Computing, in the slipstream foreseeing pads, tabs and boards as the computers of the 21st century.
In December 1995 Weiser and his boss John Seeley Brown published their article ‘Designing Calm Technology,’ meaning that ‘technology recedes into the background of our lives’ and that it ‘informs but doesn’t demand our focus or attention.’ Technology that is both calm, non-intrusive and pervasive won’t happen as long as we prefer rich-media tools on sensor-packed touch devices with sound recognition and 100 million apps. Smartwatches, digital tattoos or Google Glasses communicating with intelligent things, among them our smartphone and our smartphone-on-wheels – the connected car or favourite exoskeleton – of course won’t mitigate distraction.

Calm technology might well be the greatest paradox, dilemma, impossibility, and naivety on planet earth. Fact is however that ‘we shape our tools and thereafter our tools shape us,’ in particular our behaviour. Over time, we get perfectly comfortable with digital things and services aimed at enriching and improving us, yet counter-productivity keeps crawling up from behind. People and their tools, human and machine should organically coexist and every extra may well be a time-consuming threat.

Kiss the competition goodbye with SMAC: Social, Mobile, Analytics, Cloud
From a business perspective it’s all about crying for attention and persuading consumers to buy services and things. Digital arousal – calm in itself, yet very persistent and cheap – effectively leads to excited and timely satisfied customers. This dynamism is the rationale behind BJ Fogg’s Persuasive Tech Lab at Stanford University. It can however be argued that a well-chosen mix of calmness and persuasiveness yields the most durable customer satisfaction. Embracing your customers that way involves SMAC.

A proper combination of Social, Mobile, Analytics and Cloud intertwines things and services for a splendid customer experience. It’s all a matter of what Michael Treacy and Fred Wiersema in their 1997 book ‘The Discipline of Market Leaders’ brought under the common denominators of customer intimacy, operational excellence and product leadership. The authors advised executives to focus and choose, but in modern digital times there is no choice: disciplined market leaders do all three and operate on the basis of SMAC. Social is a dominant digital force from 2004 on: Web 2.0, Facebook; Mobile from 2007 on: touch devices, apps, smartphone-on-wheels; Analytics effectively from 2010 on, since the first international workshop on MapReduce and its applications; and Cloud from 2006 on when Amazon Web Services were launched.

Tipping point 2015
The tipping point is now, 2015. This moment has been identified as tipping point in the development of things and services in an unsuspicious ICT Industry Study, belonging to a set of 21 sectorial explorations, published in the Spring of 2012 by The Industrial College of the Armed Forces at the U.S. National Defense University. Their report places the Internet of Things on the following timeline:

0-18 months from Spring 2012 onward – this period now lies behind us
The focus lies on mobile computing, and we will see an explosion of smartphones and tablets. Privacy and security remain tricky issues, especially in the context of cyber security and legislation. This has proven to be correct, including all commotion around covert NSA practices.

18-36 months from Spring 2012 onward – that is the present
Internet connectivity is expanding across the economy. In 2008, there were already more digital things than people connected to the internet. Indeed we see mobile devices assuming the function of intermediary between the current internet and the expanding development of things and services.

3-5 years after Spring 2012 – thus from Spring 2015 onward
The development of the Internet of Things is ongoing, and autonomous machine-to-machine communication, in particular, is evolving rapidly. The so-called Smart Grid (intelligent energy supply through feedback loops) will further develop and internet connectivity is becoming increasingly “ubiquitous” and “pervasive” in the cyber-physical world of people, things, services, apps and websites. After the smartphone and tablet explosion, mashups of intelligent things and services will define the next stage of Being Digital.

SMACT by Jaap Bloem Vint Sogeti