11.500 Industry 4.0 & the Industrial Internet enthousiasts

digital transformation, Internet of Everything, Internet of things, IoE, IoT, Uncategorized

A few years back I started the group Industry 4.0 & the Industrial Internet because there was no similar LinkedIn group on the industry focus of the Internet of Things. Today we passed 11.500 members in this group! Nice to see that IoT enthousiast find eachother and share theor vision on the developments in this area. Feel free to join!

Industry 4.0 & the Industrial Internet

 

 

Internet of Things rapport Caesar Experts – Dutch

Business Model Innovation, Business models, Caesar, data, Digital maturity, digital transformation, Innovation, Internet of things, IoT, Uncategorized

Bij het Internet of Things gaat het erom dat fysieke objecten (producten,
apparaten, machines) digitale, data- en informatie gedreven toegevoegde
waarde krijgen. Met – vaak al eenvoudige – elektronica, draadloze
connectiviteit en een verbinding met het internet worden zij ‘smart’ en
‘connected’. Hiermee raken de fysieke en virtuele wereld steeds meer met
elkaar verbonden. En de technologie is er klaar voor. Sensoren en andere
elektronica worden steeds krachtiger, kleiner, energiezuiniger en tegelijkertijd
goedkoper. Draadloze connectiviteit is overal aanwezig en clouddiensten zijn
laagdrempelig in te zetten.

Ben jij ook benieuwd naar de mogelijkheden die Internet of Things (IoT) biedt voor je organsiatie? Neem contact met me op.

 

 

 

How are FinTechs Planning to Takeover the Financial Services Sector?

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This post originally appeared on SogetiLabs

Where a few years ago the banking and financial industry was steady as a rock, things can change rapidly. FinTechs are entering the market and let the traditional finance and banking industry shake on their grounds.

FinTech, referring to the overall definition of Financial Technology is used for start-ups, scale-ups and other companies who are using disruptive technology to change the way money is managed. Where the traditional finance industry is managed in traditional companies with a very unwieldy, inert and cumbrous IT infrastructure FinTechs will rule by flexibility, agility and disruption.

BI Intelligence made an overview of the FinTech Ecosystem and how it is changing the banking and financial industry due to disruptive technologies.

fintech

 

BI Intelligence divides the FinTech Ecosystem into six pillars, Payments & Transfers, Lending & Financing, Retail Banking, Financial Management, Insurance and Markets & Exchanges. As you can see FinTechs cover most of the traditional banking and finance value chain.

Very specific solutions in segmented markets is key. That is exactly what FinTechs makes hard to battle. They have very good ideas, products and services in a highly segmented market. Where FinTechs have more issues with the scale-up phase, the Financial Services industry have finds it difficult to be flexible and innovative. Questions which help you stay relevant for your customers can be:

  • What channels are my customers using and how can I adept these in my offerings?
  • How can new technology help my customer in money management?
  • How can we make banking as easy as transferring money?
  • How can we be innovative with products and services to enter new markets where my customer is moving to?

Bottom-line the message stays: FinTechs are taking over your market share financial industry, how are you reacting?

Called as one of the: Machine to Machine (M2M) -Top 100 Thought Leaders by Onalytica

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Machine to Machine (M2M) -Top 100 Thought Leaders

Machine to Machine (M2M) -Top 100 Thought Leaders

Onalytica made an overview on IoT/ Wearable tech also:

The Internet of Things – Top 100 Thought Leaders

Wearable Tech Landscape 2015: Top Influencers and Brands

According to their website, Onalytica launched our Influencer Relationship Management solution, allowing our customers to systematically manage their relationships with influential stakeholders such as investors, journalists, regulators, thought leaders and bloggers, with a view to scaling their influence and deploying their resources more efficiently. Our Influencer Relationship Management (IRM) solution allows our customers to reach the right people at the right time with the right message at scale, by building relationships with key stakeholders and managing them over time. Our Influencer Identification services allow our customers to surface credible and relevant influencers to form the foundation of their influencer marketing programmes.

Five design principles for the Internet of Relevant Things

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This article originally appeared on SogetiLabs

Five design principles for the Internet of Relevant Things

The possibility of generating data out of external or internal environments to create actionable insights, which we can steer on – is a promise that the Internet of Things brings to us. Nowadays, large industries and small start-ups are driving their businesses toward IoT-related segments to get a piece from the ‘connectivity’ pie.

Yesterday, I visited the website “Internet of Useless Things.” Despite the name, it is a very useful website to visit. The company that launched this website is called: +Rehadstudio. This website, initially, provides a great overview of connected objects, which do not really serve a business point. A good point to remember, in this context, is that not every object with a connection can provide a great breakthrough in the IoT world.

I believe… this is exactly the point that +RehadStudio wants to put forward. If you are working in the IoT segment, please think about the true reason why you should connect objects and processes. There is only one good answer here: Be relevant to your own business strategy and customers; and gain competitive advantage out of the Internet of Things. Connecting the right things is the very first step to reach this ambition.

Designing the Internet of ‘Relevant’ Things

Amid the useless IoT-related products and services, the website states five principles to help us enter the Internet of Things market, and be relevant. These five IoT design principles are:

  1. More learning, less interface
  2. Numbers need a narrative
  3. Devices that can keep a secret
  4. Improvements, not builds
  5. It’s what’s inside that counts (too)

What is your motive to connect something to the internet? Let us know.

Intel steps into the Internet of platforms

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NEWS HIGHLIGHTS according to: “Intel Unifies and Simplifies Connectivity, Security for IoT

  • Intel® IoT Platform unifies gateway, connectivity and security components to simply deploy IoT.
  • Designed to provide a repeatable foundation for devices to deliver trusted data to the cloud.
  • New integrated hardware and software products based on the platform.
  • Announces new relationships with Accenture*, Booz Allen Hamilton*, Capgemini*, Dell*, HCL*, NTT DATA*, SAP*, Tata Consultancy* and Wipro* to develop and deploy solutions on the Intel IoT Platform.

INTEL_04_iot-01-1-01

Intel+IoT+platform

Source: Intel Newsroom

Internet of Things: Revealing the secrets of your customer needs

Business models, Digital maturity, digital transformation, Inspiring, Internet of Everything, Internet of things, IoE, IoT, Leaders, Leading Digital, technology, Uncategorized

This article originally appeared on Capgemini ‘s: “Capping IT off” blog

A future where we have more interaction with our devices then with our beloved ones? Not that I am looking forward to a future where we are more in contact with our devices then the people we love but… Imagine what insights we will have about human life, the city around us and the world we live upon.  We are trying to track these summed up items already. Just think about movements such as the quantified self, smart cities and so on. Wearable technology around, upon and in us are measuring all kinds of things we do. Cities full of sensors sensing the way people live and how to build a smart system around our lives. The reason why I ask you the question is because devices tell us more than you might think. When we translate these devices into business perspective we are going to see whole other of the customer- and client we ones knew.

“Traditional industry drivers are struggling to hold their Fortune 500 position by not knowing how to really step into the world of the Internet of Things.”

 To really understand our customers & clients we need actionable insights. Even if the IoT is ‘the insight’ promise we all waited for, you might think it is not that easy. On the one hand you are right, on the other hand you are not. The data all these connected objects and devices are giving you about your company, business processes or clients are need to be actionable. If you cannot make data actionable you can have silos full of data but it will not make any sense. To make the data actionable you need a few different elements.
  1. You need devices that monitor the inner state or external environment of the process you want to steer on.
  2. The next step is to collect and store the generated data in the cloud. The cloud is scalable, flexible, it reduces costs on your own technology infrastructure, improved accessibility and so on.
  3. After you have collect and stored the data you need to analyze it. When you analyze the collected data with specialized tools you will find out patterns and you can analyze every relation you want.
  4. Now the data has been analyzed you have actionable data about the inner state or external environment of the object you let sense
So to sum up: Generate it, distribute it, store it, analyze it, make it actionable and create insights where you can, and want to steer on to reach your business goals.And, that is what the future will be like…When re-thing the position of traditional successful companies we talked about at the start of this article it made me think. Let us think the complete opposite of a traditional company who is struggling with IoT and ask an Internet of Things start-up why it does what it does and how they are reacting on today’s market changes.For that reason I had a conversation with Steve Sanders, Director of Strategic Alliances of Buddy Platform, Inc. Buddy just has launched its new platform and I talked with Sanders on how customers of Buddy benefit of their new platform and why companies should enter the era of Internet of Things.

1. Buddy Launches New Platform today, what is it about?
Buddy Platform, Inc., has launched its new platform that hosts and manages data generated by any connected device, enabling measurement of a device from the moment it’s turned on throughout its entire lifecycle. This data, often referred to as “telemetry data,” conveys information about the performance and usage of the device, and is now accessible from any common BI tool.

2. What does this mean for Buddy’s customers?
By giving product management, engineering and support teams access to this data, and the insights that are derived from it, organizations can dramatically increase their ability to build better products and support the customers of these products in-market.

3. Why should companies step into the noisy Internet of Things technology?
Quote from Sanders:

“‘Things’ can tell you a lot about your processes. Obviously, not every company can benefit from Thingification, but many will. Ultimately, not enabling electronics, machinery, automobiles, aircraft, etc. to tell their story will be a mistake.”

 4. Why is it so important for organizations to provide, collect and analyze data?
Organizations that fail to leverage device data are flying blind. Getting IoT data into the right hands, at the right time, then doing the right things with it, can be the difference between success and failure for many business units or businesses.5. How can Buddy help them with that?
Buddy works by hosting a series of regionally sandboxed, global Buddy API endpoints to which devices can send their raw telemetry data. This data is pushed into a secure storage infrastructure called BuddyVault, whereupon it is then managed, queried and exposed back to the customer in any form they wish with BuddyView. This may take the form of integrations into common business intelligence tools, or as raw APIs that can be plugged into any customer or M2M scenario.With the addition of a few lines of code, the Buddy Platform offers the lowest overhead solution for extracting telemetry data from a device, and can make an unprecedented amount of device performance data broadly accessible to an organization, including:
  • How is this device being used? Is it performing like we designed it to, is it working as expected?
  • What error codes is my device reporting, and how is that affecting the customer experience?
  • How many of my devices are being used?
  • Where are they?
  • When are they used and how often?
  • Are they on or off?
  • How are my devices communicating with one another? If not, what’s not working?
  • How are my devices performing with connected ecosystems like smart homes or industrial infrastructure?
6. What tip you would you have for companies which wants to start in the Internet of Things segment?
Work with consultants and software vendors that are willing to “play nice” with one another, and are focused on your solution’s success as the ultimate prize.  Buddy’s CEO David McLauchlan Quote:

“Now that devices as varied as door locks, light bulbs, kiosks and cars are all becoming connected, there’s a huge amount of data that can give manufacturers exactly the information they need to support and improve their products.”

 said David McLauchlan, CEO of Buddy Platform, Inc.

“Device manufacturers are not cloud infrastructure companies. They’ve built technology into their products to control the device, but haven’t built the infrastructure to access and use the device’s telemetry data to improve the product and delight customers. Buddy makes it fast and easy to access those insights and immediately understand more deeply how customers are using these kinds of IoT devices.”

continued McLauchlan.To finish this article I would like to take you to a quote from Buddy Platform Inc. its website: Devices have a story to tell. Are you listening?” When we start listening to the devices, what they see, what they hear, what they sense, we are able to get a more and more 360 degree view of our business processes and customers. And when we really know what is going on, we can really steer on situations, processes and customer needs. When we have that we can provide everything IoT has promised us…

Internet of Things, once bitten, twice shy?

Business models, Digital maturity, digital transformation, Inspiring, Internet of Everything, Internet of things, IoE, IoT, Leaders, Leading Digital, quantified, technology, Uncategorized

 This blog originally appeared on Sogeti’s technology trendlab called ViNT – Vision Inspiration Navigating Trends

“In the future (the near future, not the distant future), when you walk down the street in a strange city and stumble upon something interesting, you’ll be able to “bookmark” it for later reference. Or drill down to find out the last time someone you know was here, and whether they noted it, too.”

Do you know the saying: “Once bitten, twice shy?” At the dawn of a whole new technology era you might want to use it while you still can. The Internet of Things has arrived and so have lots of possible scenarios on the future of our interaction with technology and data. Scenario’s that will add meaning to our lives and business processes.

Maybe you think the Internet of Things is nothing more then a new bubble… But it is actually quite tangible already. Bruce Kasanoff author of the book ‘Smart Customers, Stupid Companies’ gives us some examples which of what digital sensors and wired-up objects can already do in our personal lives and businesses

  • Monitor your tire pressure and avoid dangerous blowouts;
  • Analyze the gait of elderly citizens and warn of falls before they occur;
  • Follow the gaze of shoppers and identify which products they examine – but don’t buy – in a store;
  • Monitor which pages readers of a magazine read or skip;
  • Float in the air over a factory and independently monitor the plant’s emissions;
  • Prevent intoxicated drivers from operating a motor vehicle;
  • Warn a person before he or she has a heart attack;
  • Congratulate an athlete when she swings a tennis racquet properly or achieves an efficient stride while running.

As you can see, the examples of Bruce Kasanoff are quit concrete. Think about what will happen, when we place sensors and wired-up objects in our bodies, in our houses, in our companies, in our cities and in our whole society. We will be able to measure every single part of society and business insights which will create competitor advantage on both short and long term.

Companies will be able to monitor every single process. With the Internet of Things we will finally know what a product really costs. Both personal and company decisions will be based on real time information and insights. So the question is: what do you always wanted to know?

Will be the saying: Once bitten, twice shy when in our near future be past time? Read the complete article.

Smart Things need Smart Connectivity

Business models, Digital maturity, digital transformation, Inspiring, Internet of Everything, Internet of things, IoE, IoT, Leaders, Leading Digital, quantified, technology, Uncategorized

 This blog originally appeared on Sogeti’s technology trendlab called ViNT – Vision Inspiration Navigating Trends

I came across this interview from Stacey Higginbotham on Gigaom with SmartThings CEO Alex Hawkinson and I want to share some highlights.

Alex Hawkinson who has studied at the Carnegie Mellon University achieved his Cognitive Science bachelor in 1994. After that, Hawkinson has worked at different companies and also founded a few. Currently Hawkinson is the chairman and CEO of SmartThings. SmartThings makes the connection from physical objects, ‘things’ to the digital world. When you use SmartThings you can easily monitor, control and automate these ‘things’ from anywhere you want.

SmartThings, as Hawkinson describes it, has three key-pillars.

  1. A platform which realize the connection from that everyday ‘things’ to the internet
  2. SmartApps to monitor, control and automate
  3. A toolkit for makers and developers to create their own smart ‘things’.

I have written up some quotes and highlights from the interview:

On the physical graph and the cloud…

“There are a few different layers to the technology we see needing to exist making the physical graph possible. On the one hand you need to connect the everyday objects in your life and get them connected to the internet and to the cloud. So in order to do that there are a lot of different standards right now for providing connectivity to ‘things’ in the real world. Wi-Fi, (…) Bluetooth and a range of others. And all these different standards have different purposes. (…) As the first layer we needed to create a hub device. (…) And by supporting those open standards we make it possible for consumers to get any of those off the shelve objects and immediately connect them to the smart ‘things’ cloud and control them from anywhere. But on top of that we have made a developer toolkit as well.”

On privacy…

“There is definitely privacy issues. You do not want people watching you or know where you are all times. There is a huge security layer (…) There is the ability to within a household  share information or not. My wife and I are very open about sharing that but it is not available to outsiders but, we foresee privacy controls where individuals user could protect their present information from being exposed to other apps that might be running in the same household or location. (…) The community is giving us a lot of more advice.”

On the internet of things and offline networks…

That off course happens. (…) We are allowing users and developers to define the objects in the connected physical graph in the cloud. An application then, our platform a sort of automatic recognize what components can run locally at hub level. And so it can even it is completely written in the cloud it can push some rules or some of the software down to the hub level. So if the internet connection goes down the hub is still operating all of the local network between the different devices. And so it is going to be possible that for example your presence still trigger the option to unlock the door even if the connection is down at that moment those types of things. And keep in mind that a lot of these object types have a manual interaction as well so, like the light switches they work when the regular light switch. My wife does not carry a smart phone as she walks around the house and everything a sort of works the way she would expect to. And the same goes for the door locks that a sort of code you program from the cloud that it still work even if you are disconnected for a day or something like that.”

These three Q&A’s are only a small part of a great interview. You can listen to the whole podcast here on Gigaom’s website.

When will executives understand the impact of Internet of Things?

Business models, Digital maturity, digital transformation, Inspiring, Internet of Everything, Internet of things, IoE, IoT, Leaders, Leading Digital, quantified, technology, Uncategorized
This blog originally appeared on Sogeti’s technology trendlab called ViNT – Vision Inspiration Navigating Trends

The 21st of February I joined the ‘Internet of Everything’ tweetchat from Cisco. The event was hosted by Brian Solis – @BrianSolis and everyone who joined could ask questions about the Internet of Everything to Dave Evans – @DavetheFuturist. Dave Evans is Cisco’s Chief Futurist and writes great articles about the Internet of Everything. More information about the event you can find here on Cisco’s website. There were interesting views on the ‘Internet of Everything’ and related matters. Some of them I want to discuss in this blog post using Storify.

1. What “is” the Internet of Everything?

.@davethefuturist What “is” the Internet of Everything? #WhyIOE — Brian Solis (@briansolis) February 21, 2013

IoE brings together people, process, data and things to make networked connections more relevant and valuable than ever before. #WhyIOE — Dave Evans (@DaveTheFuturist) February 21, 2013

IoE will both create new value and redistribute value based on how well companies take advantage of the oppt. that IoE represents… #WhyIOE — Dave Evans (@DaveTheFuturist) February 21, 2013

Four key pillars to IoE – people, things, process, data. #WhyIOE— Dave Evans (@DaveTheFuturist) February 21, 2013

One of the first question was: “What exactly ‘is’ the Internet of Everything? Internet of Everything is all about networked connections which will be more valuable than ever before. A Internet of Everything will create new value and redistribute value based on how well companies take advantage. When companies can track their activities and reduce cost and waste it will really be a advantage on their competitors. Companies can reduce cost in make products or deliver services to customers and companies. Products can be produced cheaper or with more added value than ever before. When companies realize this I think search terms about the Internet of things/ everything will be more hot then Facebook and social media is now… Here is how Cisco defines their 4 key pillars of Internet of Everything. In the Tweetchat there was a question about what pillar matters the most. We really have to realize that we must not focus on things, data or processes, but on us human. Technology is here to support humans, to make our lives easier.

2. What is difference between Internet of Things and the Internet of Everything?

.@davethefuturist How does @ciscosystems view the difference between Internet of Things and the Internet of Everything? #WhyIOE — Brian Solis (@briansolis) February 21, 2013

IoE builds on the foundation of IoT, by … #WhyIOE — Dave Evans (@DaveTheFuturist) February 21, 2013

 … adding network intelligence that allows convergence, orchestration, and visibility across previously disparate systems. #WhyIOE — Dave Evans (@DaveTheFuturist) February 21, 2013

The following question was about logical sequence. There are a lot of terms and definitions on the same trend. Here’s a short explanation of two of them. Internet of Things is about monitoring connected devices that we can adjust real time when needed. Reasons to adjust could be to reduce waste for example. The Internet of Everything is much further ahead of us than the Internet of Things. Every offline object will be connected to the digital world and there will be data on every object in the world. Trees, shoes, bricks and everything you can name will have a tag or an IP address etc. Chief futurist Dave Evans of Cisco said in this context: “With more than 99% of things not yet connected, we are just beginning the journey”. So when we are trying to make the definitions visual we can say. Internet of things is the start of this journey and the Internet of Everything is the end of this journey.

3. What will happen when things not only register & send data, but start to sense, think and act?

@briansolis @davethefuturist What will happen when things not only register & send data, but start to sense, think and act? 1/2 — Sander Duivestein (@duivestein) February 21, 2013

@briansolis @davethefuturist IoT becomes selfaware? A global mind? Technological singularity? 2/2 — Sander Duivestein (@duivestein) February 21, 2013

@duivestein – a digital nervous system for the planet will emerge. A new way to sense and manage our world… #WhyIOE — Dave Evans (@DaveTheFuturist) February 21, 2013

@davethefuturist You mean like a sort of hyve mind? But who controls it? And what about tech. unemployment (=Race against the Machine)? — Sander Duivestein (@duivestein) February 21, 2013

@duivestein No, not a hive mind, but a “6th sense” if you will. Our mind/s, still in “control” but with a lot more “data” to make decisions. — Dave Evans (@DaveTheFuturist) February 21, 2013

The next question was about artificial intelligence. Dave believes that  a digital nervous system will emerge in the near future. This digital nervous system will not be in control because we as humans will still be in control. It will work sort of like a 6th sense and not like a hive mind. So the prediction is that we will be in control but what will happen when we are not…?

The Internet of Everything is not the only trend a lot of people are talking about these days. Currently everyone is also talking about Big Data. But let me ask you a question: how ‘big’ is Big Data really when we look at this Internet of Everything prediction by Cisco about the number of connected objects in 2020?

I agree directly when you would say that it is only an prediction. But when we perceive these numbers as an indication, try to imagine how big ‘big data’ is really going to be if we indeed connect that number objects. When everyone has adopted the Internet of things/ everything and there are tons of connected devices we will look back and talk about the current Big Data era as we now do about 1Kb.

Find these and more great conversations of this event in my Storify summary.