Blockchain Technology – A Cure for Pharmaceutical Counterfeit (2/2)

Big Data, blockchain, Blockchain, Business Model Innovation, Business models, Distributed Ledger Technologie (DLT), Innovation, Inspiring, Leading Digital, technology, Trends, Trendwatching, Uncategorized

A few weeks back the first part of Marlou her article appeared on www.rickbouter.com. You can find the start of this article here: “Part I – Current status, Impact on the Industry

Part II – how/ practicalities

On the bright side, Blockchain is expected to totally transform the pharmaceutical industry far beyond compliance. In addition to eliminating counterfeit, reassuring patient safety, adhering to regulations, optimizing supply chain operations, and protecting revenue, Blockchain is expected to standardize and automate multiple procedures, making an intermediary party redundant.

The patient in the lead of the supply chain

The patient will be put at the lead of the supply chain, allowing a more direct patient-stakeholder interaction, and is thought to facilitate the trend of personalized medicine, by making real-time patient data accessible to pharmaceutical companies. Combined with optimal utilization of analytics, pharmaceutical companies can better meet the patient demand and more directly reach their target market. This not only eases entrance barriers of market penetration, but also provides the opportunity to restrict premium pricing. The ‘pay-for-efficacy’ principle allows the price of a pharmaceutical product to be set according to the – relative – efficacy of a pharmaceutical product. This shows similarity with the ‘no cure no pay’ principle, requiring pharmaceutical companies to even more deliberately invest in secure and stable R&D projects.

Long term vs. short term impact of Blockchain in pharma

The benefits of Blockchain for the pharmaceutical industry may not be directly reflected in their revenues, but for sure have a long term impact with the potential extension to the healthcare sector in providing healthcare of a higher quality and the ability to better shape healthcare according to specific patient needs.

Optimizing impact of Blockchain due to technological add-ons

The optimizing impact of Blockchain can be further utilized by technological add-ons such as smart contracts, sensors, artificial intelligence, and different applications of IoT. Cold-chain logistics is a concrete example of an extended concept of Blockchain, where the integration of sensors and IoT allow supply chain stakeholders to track and confirm the conditions to which the products were exposed. This strongly contributes to the ability to confirm product quality and enables the industry to specifically remove individual products in case of an error, rather than reclamation of entire batches. The bottom line of these improvements is a business case for the pharmaceutical industry, of cost reduction and increased profits, accordingly.

Blockchain: Tangible prove of potential business value

We can easily write a bookwork about the speculations of what Blockchain can and cannot do. However, what we need exactly is not found in speculations, but rather in tangible prove of potential and unlocking of the business value for the pharmaceutical industry. The industry needs to take big and concrete steps towards implementation if they want to benefit from Blockchain’s potential. A concept unknown is a concept unloved, and therefore a critical act is to increase awareness around Blockchain as a technology and break through Blockchain’s technological abstractness.

Penetrating the pharmaceutical ecosystem

Although the core concept of Blockchain has already, to a certain extent, penetrated the pharmaceutical ecosystem, the majority is still unaware of the far-reaching and innovative applicability of Blockchain in digitally transforming the pharmaceutical industry. There are several steps the industry is recommended to follow if they want to unlock the business value of Blockchain for the industry. Education is a primary aspect to address the often existing asymmetry in awareness, knowledge, and understanding of Blockchain as a technology and what it has to offer in terms of potential. Part of getting stakeholders aligned with each other is to get them on the same level of expertise and thus to provide them with the required information. In addition, stakeholder’s hesitative or negative attitude towards Blockchain is to some extent a result of their deviating or wrong perception of Blockchain’s potential and how it works, also in their advantage. A better understanding of the technology would help the industry to better grasp the concept and its application.

Stakeholders intrests at stake

To reach the stakeholders of interest and in the run-up to get them on board, a pharmaceutical consortium should be formed as a starting point. In order to create alignment across the industry, stakeholders will need to discuss their objectives, perspectives, and expectations regarding an implementation of Blockchain. A consortium creates solid ground to further build on a pharmaceutical Blockchain, step by step. Together, stakeholders can determine the pain points that deserve priority in exploring and testing and formulate a consensus as the basis of the Blockchain.

Formulating specific use cases in a fragmented industry

Generally, it is important to determine and formulate specific use cases beforehand. To prevent the industry to come up with a pain point merely to follow the Blockchain hype, there should be focused on the recognition and formulation of specific use cases in the pharmaceutical environment. Specification allows for focused testing of pilots and concepts, generating tailored outcomes rather than standardized parameters that need to be translated to a particular use case. For this to be successful, the operational processes of pharmaceutical companies need to be overseen and frameworked. Given the fragmented nature of pharmaceutical companies, let alone the industry as a whole, achieving adoption is a fairly complicated process.

Mobilizing the pharmaceutical chain

The pharmaceutical industry will need to better cooperate with each other, allowing for change in their processes and behaviors. However, this is not so much of a rational process as it might have been pretended to be. Proving business value and encouraging stakeholders to embrace Blockchain definitely are steps in the right direction, but do not provide a guarantee of the technology to succeed in the pharmaceutical ecosystem. Practically, the conventional, risk-averse nature of the pharmaceutical industry and their need for evolution over revolution may just be difficult to unify with the disruptive, revolutionizing character of Blockchain. This large gap between technology and business may strain industry-wide adoption, even though stakeholders are on board with the solution. Another aspect challenging the implementation of Blockchain, but is difficult to address, is the quality of the input and the data recorded onto the Blockchain. Despite the immutable nature of the technology, the quality of the Blockchain is only as good as the quality of the information that is entered. It will be extremely difficult to qualify the channel where the information enters the Blockchain, which impinges on the promised trustless character of Blockchain.

Conclusion: Blockchain: turning the inevitable into the desirable

All in all, the previously anticipated resistance coming from the pharmaceutical industry is better to be redefined as hesitation to get involved with what is uncertain and unknown. The pharmaceutical industry needs to put the blocks together and build a solid ground to embrace digitalization, which does not imply having to set aside their cautious, hesitative attitude nor their responsibility. A way to go is to invest in education, the formation of a pharmaceutical consortium, and additional testing in the act to unlock Blockchain’s business value for the pharmaceutical industry, to once and forever turn the inevitable into the desirable, and harvest the benefits. Nevertheless, the pharmaceutical industry should keep a critical eye on the anticipated challenges as well as on new emerging technologies that are on their way to overhaul the potential of Blockchain.

Biography

With a background in Pharmaceutical Sciences, Marlou is currently in the last stage of the Master’s program Science and Business Management, pursuing her passion of unlocking the synergy between life science and business. Her ambition is to improve and strengthen the collaborative relationship of life science and business development, through encouraging communication and cooperation between the different fields. After finalizing her graduate internship at Accenture Strategy, The Netherlands, focusing on the potential of Blockchain for the pharmaceutical supply chain, Marlou is starting a PhD in human psychopharmacology at Swinburne University, Melbourne, Australia, striving for the aspired career in the pharmaceutical industry.

Image credits: Image 1, Disruptordaily Image 2, UKRInvest Image 3, Statnews

Can you separate hype from trend?

Innovation, Inspiring, Leaders, Leading Digital, Trends, Trendwatching

If you look in fashion, music, energy or technology, the world is changing fast. Very fast. As CXO or management you live in an exited time where trends can be gamechangers for the long term. But as company leader you cannot know everything what is happening in your market and the world around it. Often you do not take enough time to dive into trends and their developments.

So that is what we will do for you!

“Trends are developments in a marketsegment, technology or whatsoever that can be gamechangers in a certain area for the long term.”

For the fact that the world is changing fast we want to help you determine what the future ‘might’ bring. Help you seperate hype from long term trends which can help you make strategic choices.

For the reason I am not an expert in every field I asked a few people to write a guest blog on trends they have identified within their field of expertise.

So what does a guest trendblog looks like? The bloggers will write about several marketsegments and developments they see happening in these markets.

  • Intro: What market or field do they write about
  • The need: What issues or ambitions are relevant in these markets
  • Enablers: What kind of enablers do they see
  • Trends: Towards what trends do these enablers develop
  • Impact: What impact will these trends have on business models
  • Chances: What kind of chanches will these trends offer companies

Are you also interested in writing a trend guest blog in a certain field? Let me know!

Rick

 

Image credit

#4 books on technology & digital transformation you should read

Business Model Innovation, Business models, Capgemini, Capgemini Consulting, Didier Bonnet, Digital maturity, Digital Strategy, digital transformation, Expert Connect, Innovation, Internet of things, Leading Digital, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MIT, MIT sloan

These days there are an exploding amount of books on technology. Personally I think the books below are really insight full and I would recommand these books.

 

#1 – “The Second Machine Age” by Erik Brynjolfsson & Andrew McAfee

View, “Race with the machines: Erik Brynjolfsson at TED2013”, here

 

#2 – “Leading Digital” – “Turning technology into business transformation” from George Westerman of MIT, Didier Bonnet of Capgemini Consulting, and Andrew McAfee, also at MIT.

View Didier Bonnet’s keynote presentation on “Leading Digital” at Oracle Open World 2014 here.

 

#3 – “The Innovators” – “How a Group of Hackers, Geniuses, and Geeks Created the Digital Revolution”, by Walter Isaacson

The Washington Post Book review, The New York Times review, The Wallstreet Journal review

Check Walter Isaacson out during a Google Talk discussion

 

#4 – “Enchanted Objects” – by David Rose

His popular book, Enchanted Objects: Design, Human Desire, and the Internet of Things, focuses on the future of the internet of things and how these technologies will impact the ways we live and work. He’s also a lecturer at the MIT Media Lab and has worked with the Tangible Media and City Science groups. David holds patents for photo sharing, interactive TV, ambient information displays and medical devices. His work has been featured at the MoMA, covered in The New York Times, WIRED, The Economist, and parodied on The Colbert Report. Source: https://enchantedobjects.com/about/

Check out David Rose his Tedx keynote on Enchanted Objects

Photo credit featured image

Final thesis: Internet of Things for business: From sick(care) to health(care)

Artificial Intelligence, Business Model Innovation, Business models, Innovation, Inspiring, Internet of Everything, Internet of things, IoE, IoT, Kevin Ashton, Kevin Kelly, Leaders, Leading Digital, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MIT, Steve Jobs, technology

A data driven future

Internet of Things for business: From sick(care) to health(care)

Report i wrote for my final thesis at Sogeti, ViNT – Verkenning Instituut New Technology.

Whitepaper Internet of Things (IoT) – Informatie gedreven toegevoegde waarde

Innovation, Inspiring, Internet of Everything, Internet of things, IoE, IoT, Leading Digital, technology

De toegevoegde waarde van Internet of Things Internet of Things als wereldwijde trend Het Internet of Things wordt wereldwijd gezien als een van de belangrijkste technologische en business trends en wordt ook wel de ‘4e industriële revolutie’ genoemd. Het gerenommeerde adviesbureau McKinsey plaatst het in de top-3 van meest impactvolle ontwikkelingen en de voorspellingen zijn dat er in 2020 ongeveer 50 miljard connected devices zijn.

Informatie gedreven toegevoegde waarde

Bij het Internet of Things gaat het erom dat fysieke objecten (producten, apparaten, machines) digitale, data- en informatie gedreven toegevoegde waarde krijgen. Met – vaak al eenvoudige – elektronica, draadloze connectiviteit en een verbinding met het internet worden zij ‘smart’ en ‘connected’. Hiermee raken de fysieke en virtuele wereld steeds meer met elkaar verbonden. En de technologie is er klaar voor. Sensoren en andere elektronica worden steeds krachtiger, kleiner, energiezuiniger en tegelijkertijd goedkoper. Draadloze connectiviteit is overal aanwezig en clouddiensten zijn laagdrempelig in te zetten. Kansen met nieuwe inzichten en met invloed op afstand Er ontstaat inzicht over gebeurtenissen in de fysieke wereld die er voorheen niet was en het wordt mogelijk om acties op afstand en op ieder moment in gang te zetten. Zo ontstaan enerzijds kansen voor kostenreductie, procesverbetering en kwaliteitsverbetering. Anderzijds ontstaan kansen voor nieuwe productfuncties, additionele (digitale) diensten, nieuwe business en verdienmodellen en geheel nieuwe experiences. Een van de belangrijkste meerwaarden van slimme en internet verbonden producten is dat het mogelijk wordt om inzicht te krijgen in klant- en gebruiksgedrag. Hiermee wordt het mogelijk om de klant nog beter van dienst te zijn en met het doorlopende contact dat ontstaat kan de relatie verder worden verbeterd. De vergaarde data en informatie is bovendien waardevolle input voor het ontwikkelen van volgende generaties producten en diensten.

Digital Transformation: “Making sense of the mess we made with it”

Artificial Intelligence, Business Model Innovation, Business models, Capgemini Consulting, Digital maturity, Digital Strategy, digital transformation, Innovation, Leaders, Leading Digital, Marketing, technology

 

This article originally appeared on SogetiLabs

 

Digital Transformation

It does not matter how big or small you are. Concepts of innovation are overwhelming your feeds on different social platforms. Over-hyped technology buzz-words and start-up (or whatever) approaches are knocking on our doors… but do they make sense?

 An important thing to remember is to start with your company goals and apply technology to achieve these goals. Not the other way around. A lot of companies are adopting different types of technologies, but have no clue about what they should do with it.

Let us start from the beginning. We are living in a Digital world. Technology is everywhere around us. With Digital going mainstream, we will talk about Digital Transformation.

In a nutshell: 

  “Digital Transformation is the collective noun of the movement, which intertwine the physical and digital world to better determine client, customer and target audience needs to deliver excellent products & services with an excellent digital experience by the use of new technology.”

If you ask me, Digital Transformation is the process that companies follow when applying new technology to reach company goals. It’s about having a strategic mindset of what you want to reach and then applying the fitting technology to get a step (or a few) closer.

Digital Transformation is a new way of developing / working / delivering for you and your company; but it improves those items on various aspects. Think about the possibilities for items like: Visibility, efficiency, effectiveness, value creation, speed, scalability, customer experience, product development, innovation and so on.

An important thing to remember is: Step out of all the rumors and think about your vision. What do you want to reach? Then apply the right technology, which supports that vision.

Another important thing to note is: Be where your target audience is. Let your company be inspired by the way your customers use Digital solutions and facilitate them in using it. Make their lives easier by adding value to the reason of your existence, your products and services.

Of course, Digital Transformation is going to change the way you develop / work and deliver. Of course, your business model will change. But it will change your business model in a way to get closer to the people you serve. Is it a bad thing? No way. It has always been like this and will always be. The only thing that changes is the trend or technology we are talking about. In a few years, you will only remember the following:

“Digital Transformation: The paradigm shift towards business as usual”

If you want to learn more about Digital Transformation and find out answers on questions like:

  • “What is Digital Transformation?”
  • “How can I use Digital Transformation in my advantage?”
  • “How to adapt/ implement a Digital Transformation Strategy”
  • “How can I offer solutions that serves the client/ customer need in 2020?”
  • “What is the relation between Digital Transformation & Digital Customer Experience?”

Click here

SMAC Your Customer with Things & Services – A historic necessity unfolds

Business Model Innovation, Business models, Capgemini, Capgemini Consulting, Carlota Perez, Digital maturity, Digital Strategy, digital transformation, Expert Connect, Innovation, Inspiring, Internet of Everything, Internet of things, IoE, IoT, Leading Digital

This article originally appeared on Capgemini ‘s Expert Connect “Capping IT off” blog in the category: Digital Strategies.

This blog post is a joint effort of SogetiLabs members Jaap Bloem & Rick Bouter.

Services companies nowadays extend the customer journey with products while product brands add services to optimize customer intimacy. Either way, digital does the trick and often sensors and smartphone apps are involved to gather and deliver information and functionality. Nissan has a special smartwatch for car functions, Philips now sells the Hue personal wireless lighting system, insurers offer personalized pricing based on driving behaviour and energy companies let customers profit from smart metering. Microsoft and Nokia specialize in devices and services, from Lumia Windows phones and navigation to XBOX Music and SmartGlass. ParkMe is the largest real-time car parker in the United States delivering physical space though digital information. One of the nicest examples of how a cross-industry ecosystem of digital things and services could function is the Microsoft HealthVault vision. And Motorola makes the case for password pills, adding swallowables to wearables like Google Glass.

PICT: Personal, Intelligent & Calm Things
When Kevin Ashton, director of the MIT Auto-ID Institute, in 1999 operationalized his RFID solution at Procter & Gamble, calling it the Internet of Things, he could only have dreamed of what an adolescent Internet of Things and Services – to quote Bosch – might economically mean. From 2015 on, trillions of dollars are projected by experts from McKinsey and Harbor Research, among many others. This is Bill Buxton’s ‘long nose of innovation’ in action and that has nothing to do with lies. For technological innovation to really take off always lasts a few decades, as we know from the work of Carlota Perez.

Unspecific names are used to denote the impact of digital things and services, ranging from the Internet of Everything (Cisco) to the Industrial Internet (General Electric), the Internet of Sensors and Actuators (Vint Cerf, Google) or the Web of the World (Marc Davis, Microsoft). Germans speak of Industrie 4.0, the new wave after mechanization, electrification and information technology.

From a consumer perspective the best way to describe what’s going on around the individual would be PICT: Personal, Intelligent & Calm Things based on PICTechnology, or Personal ICT, including Near Field Computing (NFC) rings and bracelets. Three years ago, the Georgia Institute of Technology delivered an article called The Internet of Nano-Things and indeed developments coming from the Manchester UK Graphene Institute will greatly improve what will be possible with digital things and services.

A Matter of Time
Some twenty years ago, back in 1995, MIT Media Lab director Nicholas Negroponte published a book that by its title says it all: ‘Being Digital.’ One major conclusion was already drawn after the first pages:  ‘computing is not about computers anymore, it’s about living.’ Years before, in 1988, Xerox PARC’s chief technologist Mark Weiser had started to talk about Ubiquitous Computing, aka Pervasive Computing, in the slipstream foreseeing pads, tabs and boards as the computers of the 21st century.
In December 1995 Weiser and his boss John Seeley Brown published their article ‘Designing Calm Technology,’ meaning that ‘technology recedes into the background of our lives’ and that it ‘informs but doesn’t demand our focus or attention.’ Technology that is both calm, non-intrusive and pervasive won’t happen as long as we prefer rich-media tools on sensor-packed touch devices with sound recognition and 100 million apps. Smartwatches, digital tattoos or Google Glasses communicating with intelligent things, among them our smartphone and our smartphone-on-wheels – the connected car or favourite exoskeleton – of course won’t mitigate distraction.

Calm technology might well be the greatest paradox, dilemma, impossibility, and naivety on planet earth. Fact is however that ‘we shape our tools and thereafter our tools shape us,’ in particular our behaviour. Over time, we get perfectly comfortable with digital things and services aimed at enriching and improving us, yet counter-productivity keeps crawling up from behind. People and their tools, human and machine should organically coexist and every extra may well be a time-consuming threat.

Kiss the competition goodbye with SMAC: Social, Mobile, Analytics, Cloud
From a business perspective it’s all about crying for attention and persuading consumers to buy services and things. Digital arousal – calm in itself, yet very persistent and cheap – effectively leads to excited and timely satisfied customers. This dynamism is the rationale behind BJ Fogg’s Persuasive Tech Lab at Stanford University. It can however be argued that a well-chosen mix of calmness and persuasiveness yields the most durable customer satisfaction. Embracing your customers that way involves SMAC.

A proper combination of Social, Mobile, Analytics and Cloud intertwines things and services for a splendid customer experience. It’s all a matter of what Michael Treacy and Fred Wiersema in their 1997 book ‘The Discipline of Market Leaders’ brought under the common denominators of customer intimacy, operational excellence and product leadership. The authors advised executives to focus and choose, but in modern digital times there is no choice: disciplined market leaders do all three and operate on the basis of SMAC. Social is a dominant digital force from 2004 on: Web 2.0, Facebook; Mobile from 2007 on: touch devices, apps, smartphone-on-wheels; Analytics effectively from 2010 on, since the first international workshop on MapReduce and its applications; and Cloud from 2006 on when Amazon Web Services were launched.

Tipping point 2015
The tipping point is now, 2015. This moment has been identified as tipping point in the development of things and services in an unsuspicious ICT Industry Study, belonging to a set of 21 sectorial explorations, published in the Spring of 2012 by The Industrial College of the Armed Forces at the U.S. National Defense University. Their report places the Internet of Things on the following timeline:

0-18 months from Spring 2012 onward – this period now lies behind us
The focus lies on mobile computing, and we will see an explosion of smartphones and tablets. Privacy and security remain tricky issues, especially in the context of cyber security and legislation. This has proven to be correct, including all commotion around covert NSA practices.

18-36 months from Spring 2012 onward – that is the present
Internet connectivity is expanding across the economy. In 2008, there were already more digital things than people connected to the internet. Indeed we see mobile devices assuming the function of intermediary between the current internet and the expanding development of things and services.

3-5 years after Spring 2012 – thus from Spring 2015 onward
The development of the Internet of Things is ongoing, and autonomous machine-to-machine communication, in particular, is evolving rapidly. The so-called Smart Grid (intelligent energy supply through feedback loops) will further develop and internet connectivity is becoming increasingly “ubiquitous” and “pervasive” in the cyber-physical world of people, things, services, apps and websites. After the smartphone and tablet explosion, mashups of intelligent things and services will define the next stage of Being Digital.

SMACT by Jaap Bloem Vint Sogeti

Digital Transformation: The paradigm shift towards business as usual

Brian Solis, Business models, Capgemini, Capgemini Consulting, Didier Bonnet, Digital maturity, digital transformation, George Westerman, IBM, Inspiring, Internet of Everything, Internet of things, IoE, IoT, Leaders, Leading Digital

Where back in the days technology, techies, were seen as weird people which every office needed for I(C)T development and maintance, this view has changes. We are now looking with respect to all kinds of self-made technology billionars of Sillicon Valley. Compared to the pre 2000’s, technology is a hot topic. There is a lot of noise around different elements and types of new technology. Whether we talk about 3D-printing, Augmented Reality, Big Data, Social, Mobile, Analytics, Cloud, (SMAC) + Internet of Things (SMACT), Wireless Power, Robotics, Computer brain interfaces, Human Augmentation, Artificial Intelligence (AI), Digital Customer Experience (DCX), all these topics are in the marketing buzz machines of big industrial leaders or even made on kitchentables by (as Chris Anderson called them) the makers of these days. Lets deepdive in the topic Digital Transformation:

  • “What is Digital Transformation?”
  • “How can I use Digital Transformation in my advantage?”
  • “How to implement a Digital Transformation Strategy”
  • “How can I offer solutions that serves the client/ customer need in 2020?”
  • “What is the relation between Digital Transformation & Digital Customer Experience?”

If you ask me:

“Digital Transformation is the collective noun of the movement which intertwine the physical and digital world to better determine client, customer and target audience needs to deliver excellent products & services with an excellent digital experience by the use of new technology.”

The reason  why I come up with this definition is as follows. Every company exist because it delivers some sort of value, in some sort of way, to some sort of audience. A lot of ‘some sorts’, you might say, and, you are right. But does your company knows, why they deliver what to whom? If you are thinking, on one of those point above I have know idea what I am doing, keep on reading. If you do this already, congratiulations, keep that position. On the other hand, who says that you are doing this already? You, or your client? That is right, keep on reading as well.

Digital Transformation refers to the use of digital tools, new technology to better define customer needs. When companies can define customer/ client needs in a better way, they can provide a better solution. A better solution, whether it is a product or service. Defining customer needs has always been the key activity in marketing. And, even this core activity has changed to ‘hang out’ on digital for some brands, defining needs is key. Because delivering what your audience need is the reason why you exist as a company. To build upon that, customers are getting more and more familiar with digital concepts. Adoption of new technology is increasing by wearable technology and so there is a shift of channel choise on the client side. For that reason companies should make sure that they deliver in the new JIT methode. In the right channel, on the right time, delivering the right solution for the customer need. That it, bottomline, what every new technology is about. Increasing your company to identify B2C/ B2B needs to provide them with better solutions.

The Guardians ‘s Howard King describes in his article called: “What is digital transformation?”  three key drivers of transformation:

“There are three key drivers of transformation: changing consumer demand, changing technology and changing competition. These, of course, are an ecosystem and it is always a convergence of factors that brings about changes in a market.”

There is no such thing as disruption

There is no such thing as overall disruption. The only thing we see today in different market segments all over the world is that companies deliver their belief in a different way then they used to deliver. The Digital way. The reason for this is, that they need to… Customers, clients and target audience groups can no longer be found in traditional channels. Therefor, companies need to change the way they deliver their reason of existance in other, non traditional, channels. And that relates also to another topic where a lot of people are thinking about these days: Digital Customer Experience (DCX).

But, even is Digital Tormation as a fall of business as usual, it tells us something else: “Digital Transformation: The paradigm shift towards business as usual”

Adapt or Die

And that, that is what I call: Digital Transformation. For that reason I will give you the same advice as my Sogeti ViNT colleagues. Design To Disrupt.

“Are you the one who is going to disrupt, or are you going to be disrupted?”

Here is the complete article on Slideshare

This is my point of view on Digital Transformation, now lets see how you can improve your digital journey!

Digital Transformation Strategy Review

Are you interested in the topic: Digital Transformation and how it impacts business and strategy? Take a look at the: “Digital Transformation Strategy Review” community on LinkedIn.

Charline Li: “Leadership in the Digital Era, Giving Up Control.”

Altimeter, Brian Solis, Business models, digital transformation, Inspiring, Leaders, Leading Digital, Marketing

“In business today, the need for innovation and rapid decision-making trumps yesterday’s drive for efficiency. How does this influence what it means to be an effective leader? Charlene Li explains that it’s less about control and more about empowerment: enabling employees to acquire the information they need, so they can make their own decisions.”

“Charlene is the CEO and principal analyst at Altimeter Group, and author of The New York Times bestseller Open Leadership. She is also the co-author of the critically acclaimed, bestselling book Groundswell, named one of 2008’s best business books. She is one of the foremost experts on social media, and a consultant and independent thought-leader on leadership, strategy, social technologies, interactive media and marketing. Fast Company recognized Ms. Li as one of the 100 most creative people in business in 2010, and one of the most influential women in technology in 2009. You can follow her blog at charleneli.com/blog.”

“About the TED Institute: We know that innovative ideas and fresh approaches to challenging problems can be discovered inside visionary companies around the world. The TED Institute helps surface and share these insights. Every year, TED works with a group of select brands to identify internal ideators, inventors, connectors, and creators. Drawing on the same rigorous regimen that has prepared speakers for the TED main stage, TED Institute works closely with each partner, overseeing curation and providing intensive one-on-one talk development to sharpen and fine tune ideas. “

Source

Ted Institute

http://www.charleneli.com/

Kevin Ashton, the man, the legend who brought us the Internet of Things

Business models, digital transformation, Inspiring, Internet of Everything, Internet of things, IoE, IoT, Kevin Ashton, Leaders, Leading Digital, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, MIT, MIT sloan

What started as a business issue, resulted in one of the most impactfull technology trends we are known with today, the Internet of Things. But what is it and who invented this term? In this article a few insights on What IoT is, and who the brain behind this vision is. If we look to the founding father of the definition: “The Internet of Things” we see Kevin Ashton. Ashton, a visionary mind who took the opportunity to change the world as we know it today. The man who changed our vision on the intertwining of physical and digital worlds. And it all started with lipstick.

Kevin Ashton

When I wrote my final thesis on the Internet of Things back in early 2013s had the privalige to interview Ashton on this topic. His idea on IoT and the further research I did resulted into my definition of IoT:

“Internet of Things (IoT) refer to the collective noun for the general idea to connect the physical to the digital via embedded technology. To receive data from all kind of smart objects from the past, the current and the future to communicate and sense or interact with their internal state or the external environment to simplify and facilitate human life, improve business processes, reduce costs and risks and raise efficiency.“ – Rick Bouter

After Cisco had a conversation with Ashton they made a small summary & infographic of his life which you can find below: “It all started with lipstick. A particularly popular color of Oil of Olay lipstick that Kevin Ashton had been pushing as a brand manager at Procter & Gamble was perpetually out of stock. He decided to find out why, and found holes in data about the supply chain that eventually led him to drive the early deployment of RFID chips on inventory. Asked by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology to start a group — the Auto-ID Center — that would research RFID technology, he found a way to talk about RFID to a less-than-computer-savvy crowd – by coining the phrase the Internet of Things or IoT. Ashton exploded the Auto-ID Center it into an international lab with 103 sponsors. After helping found a few startups, he’s “retired” into writing, with his first book, How to Fly a Horse: The Secret History of Creation, Invention, and Discovery, due out in January.” Listen to the full podcast here! Cisco Newsroom

image_gallerySources

Bouter, Rick, “Internet of Things: for business and beyond (1/2)”, Sogeti ViNT, September 25th, 2013

Many, Kevin, “Kevin Ashton, Father of the Internet of Things & Network Trailblazer“, Cisco Newsroom, December 8th, 2014